/Which company makes the most reliable hard drive? Which disks can be avoided?

Which company makes the most reliable hard drive? Which disks can be avoided?

The question I’ve been asked a lot is “The hardest drive to buy?” The question is difficult to answer, because in the absence of dozens of disk tours, the manufacturers say that you rely on personal experience from a limited sample set (anecdote).

There is an organization that has dozens of records and it keeps an eye on failure rates. This company is a backblaze cloud backup company.

Must wear: Don’t make this zoom mistake!

Backblaze Q12020 has published hard drive statistics, analyzing the failure rates of 129,764 hard drives in HGST, Toshiba and Seagate (this figure rejects test drive and disk models, backblaze has less than 60 powered).

The data gives us an interesting insight into reliability.

Strengthening data for the first quarter of 2020

Backblaze

Somewhat immediately stood out which was Seagate’s failure at the time. That said, the backblaze has a lot of Seagate drives, so the ATFR or fault controlled rate, which is calculated as follows, is more understandable:

AFR = (drive fallings / (day of drive / 366) * 100

Note: The Backblaze report specifies why it was used.

Although the average AFR for the reporting period was 1.07 percent, it was the lowest backlash since 2013, with an ATFR of 1.56 percent in the first quarter of 2016.

However, the worst unit for the Seagate drive was the AFR – 4TB ST4000 DM1000, 1.42 percent, 1212TB behind the ST12000NM10008, 1.41% FR.

Interestingly, the two HGST disk models – the 8GB HUH728080ALE600 and the 12TB HUH721212ALE604 – both failed in a relatively large number of “drive days” (the number of days the drive had).

Backblaze announced in the first quarter that by the end of 2019 it will use 4TB units, reducing it to about 15,000. In fact, it still has about 35,000.

RQ1 2019 announced that Backblaze will test a 20 TB drive, including Seagate and / or MAMR drives from Western digital-based HAMR drives. Currently none of them.

So basically, disks seem to be more reliable but some are more reliable than others.