/Second Stimulus Test: Where we stand since the beginning of July

Second Stimulus Test: Where we stand since the beginning of July

WASHINGTON (Next) – Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says the Senate will consider a new stimulus package in July this week, but some fear the new jobs report will scrap any plans to provide second-round economic relief to Americans.

The U.S. unemployment rate stood at 11.1% in June, as the economy added a record 47.6 million jobs, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This follows May’s report that the country shows 2.5 million job gains. Keeping in view the trend of employment growth, many analysts believe that lawyers may move on to the second phase of the stimulus check, pointing to the early signs of economic recovery.

Nevertheless, President Donald Trump recently suggested moving toward an “extremely liberal” second round of relief. How and why this can happen is unclear.

“We’ll package another stimulus,” President Trump said in a late-June interview.

After giving some details, the President said, “It will be very good. It would be very generous. “

Asked how much the payment might be, Trump said, “You’ll find out. You know for yourself. “Trump added that he thought the relief fund would have bipartisan support and could be announced” in the next few weeks. “

Second stimulus: Minuchin says the White House will “seriously consider” further funding.

According to a comment made by McConnell this week, we should have a better idea of ​​a relief timeline before the end of the month.

“As you may have heard, I said back in March that we would look at this again… probably in July কোথায় where we are, take a snapshot of a healthy and economic recovery front and decide at that moment what more needs to be done,” McConnell said. Said Tuesday.

Congress and the Senate will retire from July 3 to July 20. The Senate is unlikely to consider any additional relief package before July 20.

In a statement Tuesday, McConnell accused Democrats of “political drama.”

“This political theater is contrary to the serious approach of the CRS that created the Care Act,” McConnell said in a statement on Tuesday. “Any other recovery efforts should focus on three issues: children, work and healthcare. Partisan theater and politicization are not what our country needs, ”McConnell added.

Offer on the table

In late March, President Trump signed into law a stimulus package that included a one-time payment of 200 1,200 for eligible Americans. As the weeks have turned into months since the Coronavirus Assistance, Relief and Economic Protection (KRES) Act was passed, many Americans are wondering when and when the second check or prepaid debit card will come as the epidemic continues.

Currently on the table is a proposal Heroes Act, a 3 3 trillion bill, which includes 27 275 billion for testing and risk pay for healthcare workers and ট্র 1 trillion for state and local governments.

The second stimulus check is most likely coming in July, the U.S. Senate said

The Heroes Act was passed by the House Democrats in May and will offer a further দ 1,200 check for American adults and children. It also expands the number of people eligible for government assistance by college students and older adolescents. Payments will be made to 6,000,000 per family.

Politics in drama

If you ask lawmakers why the extra payments weren’t distributed to Americans, Democrats will point fingers at McConnell and Republicans will blame House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

Bottom line for you: There are no new checks until things work out. And in the nation’s capital, it’s not always easy.

Rodney Davis, a Republican congressman from Illinois, said, “I’m not optimistic that anything will happen in Washington when it comes to any other COVID-related stimulus bill.” “Speaker Pelosi himself decided to put together a trillion-dollar wish list and allow everyone in Washington to go back to their biased corners.”

Some lawmakers, such as Roger Marshall, a Republican from Kansas, feel that we need a “wait and see” approach to any future relief.

“I don’t think we need to spend more money right now.”

Davis believes that the way Democrats took the ৩ 3 trillion burden on the Heroes Act makes it “more difficult to put together any bipartisan legislation in the future.”

As you can imagine, Davis and Marshall’s colleagues on the other side of the isle see things differently.

“We’re waiting for Mitch McConnell to step down from his back and do something to the Senate,” said a Democrat from Massachusetts. Jim McGover says. “So far, he has done nothing.”

“We need to do something,” McGovern added.

Rip David Cecilin, a Democrat from Rhode Island, agrees with McGronn that McConnell needs to take action – even if it creates its own GOP relief package and tries to continue it.

“There’s nothing he can do,” Cecilin said. “There are a lot of people being affected in this country, there are a lot of people who were affected by COVID-19 and they hope Congress will provide additional relief.”

White House advisers want payments to get people ‘most in need’

Larry Cudlow, who serves as director of the White House National Economic Council, told Fox News Business that he thinks “tax breaks or direct mail checks” are being considered, but he believes working Americans should be targeted by the government.

“Perhaps, we want to target people who have lost their jobs and are most in need,” Fodd told Business News. “It’s a speculation on my part, but I think … that’s where it’s going.”

Second stimulus check: Cudlow says potential checks should be made to people ‘most needed’

Cudlow said Trump wants “incentive-based policies,” such as paid vacations, to get people back to work. He added that President Trump is considering discounts for restaurants, entertainment, tourism and sightseeing.

When he was pushed, Cudlow said he thought tax exemptions or direct mail payments were “on the table” but qualified the statement that they were still at a “pre-determined” stage.

“We want it to be a constructive package,” Cudlow said. “It simply came to our notice then. I don’t want to say for sure … I don’t want to say I don’t want to … but I know it’s on the table.