/Minneapolis City Council vows to disband police department after George Floyd’s death

Minneapolis City Council vows to disband police department after George Floyd’s death

Several members of the Minneapolis City Council have vowed to disband the city’s police department to end the city’s current policing system, including a ban on nitrates and neck arrests.

Nine of the 12 council members attended a rally in Powderhorn Park in South Minneapolis on Sunday (local time) and promised to invest in a public safety model instead.

The Associated Press reports that Jeremiah Allison, a council member who was in police custody last month after George Floyd’s death, promised to “break up” the council.

“It was your fight that brought us to this moment, so that not a moment’s silence is broken,” Councilor Allison told the public to stand on a platform marked “Dependent Police.”

Councilor Allison later said in a statement on Twitter: “We will take interim steps toward the end of the MPD in the coming weeks and months through the budget process and other policies and budget decisions.”

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After Mr. Floyd’s May 25 Memorial Day death, Minneapolis became the epicenter of violent and peaceful protests.

A handcuffed black man, Mr. Floyd (4), died after a white officer knelt on Mr. Floyd’s neck for about nine minutes, ignoring Mr. Floyd’s cries of “I can’t breathe,” and kept him there even after Mr. Floyd. Stop moving

The incident was videotaped, inspiring anti-apartheid protests around the world and sparking widespread street protests across America. Protesters in Sydney, Melbourne, London, Paris, Berlin and other cities have received the message “Black Lives Matter”.

Three police officers involved in George Floyd’s death have been arrested and charged with murder and aiding and abetting his arrest.

Former fourth officer Derek Chauvin, who knelt on the African American man’s neck, promoted the charge of third-degree murder to second-degree murder.

টুইট Jeremiah 4 Tweets from North

When the Minnesota State Department began a civil rights investigation last week, Councilor Alison called on protesters to continue protesting against police brutality, ABC News reported Monday.

Community activists have been criticizing the department for years, saying it is a racist and brutal culture that opposes change.

The first concrete changes came on Friday when the municipality agreed to ban suffocation and neck resistance.

Meanwhile, protesters in Rome held their fists in the air on Sunday, shouting, “There is no justice, no peace!” People in the UK are refusing official warnings not to lie down outside the US embassy while in the capital.

In Belgium, police fired tear gas and used a water cannon to disperse about 100 protesters in central Brussels, including many shops and restaurants in Africa. Several protesters were later arrested.

They were part of a crowd of about ten thousand people at the Palace of Justice, wearing many masks and banners, including the sentences “Black Living Material – From Belgium to Minneapolis”, “I Can’t Breathe” and “Stop Killing Black People”.

On Saturday, thousands of Australians gathered in Brisbane, Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney CBD to protest racism and the deaths of detainees.

The appellate court declared an unlicensed rally less than fifteen minutes before its license was set, after at least 20,000 people joined central Sydney this March.

Dramatic social media footage showed protesters in Bristol, in western England, cheering as they tore down a statue of 17th-century slave trader Edward Colston and threw him into a river.

U.S. embassies were the epicenter of protests elsewhere in Europe, with 10,000 gathered in the Danish capital, Copenhagen, hundreds in Budapest, and thousands in Madrid, where police-occupied streets were flooded with riot nets.

Curfews have been lifted in other US states

Police in riot gear stormed a rally on Friday, removing hundreds of protesters by truck. Police in riot gear stormed a rally on Friday, removing hundreds of protesters by truck.

“I want to thank everyone who has calmly expressed their views,” Mayor Bill de Blasio said Monday (AST).

“I have decided to end the curfew. And really, I hope we have a curfew for the last time in New York City. “

While lifting the curfew, the mayor said it was not yet decided whether to ban Manhattan traffic south of P9th Street.

The curfew is set to take effect at 8pm tonight, New York’s first in a decade, as officials plan to adopt the plan as the city enters the first phase of reopening after being closed for nearly three months. The virus is down.

The mayor said police arrested only four people and issued 24 summonses to the court on Saturday.

Local politicians and civil liberties advocates have called for it to end by 8am. Curfew, and complained that it caused unnecessary friction as officials tried to enforce it.

But Mayor de Blasio initially insisted that the entire curfew over the weekend was fine.

The curfew comes as New York prepares to reopen several businesses on Monday, including manufacturing and construction companies, wholesalers and retailers.

Retailers will not be allowed to bring customers for another two weeks, but they can allow people to pick up or move products on the sidewalk.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo reiterated his call for people to take part in the protest.

The governor said Sunday, “Take a test, take a test,” adding that the state planned to open 15 test sites dedicated to protesters only so that they could get results quickly.

There have been 1,938,842 confirmed cases of the coronavirus in the United States and the death toll has risen to 110,482.

– Including agency