/Blue Joyce Notebook: Lord’s Guerrilla Jr. May Benefit in Short Season

Blue Joyce Notebook: Lord’s Guerrilla Jr. May Benefit in Short Season

TORONTO – If one thing is certain about this short MLB season, it’s that we’re going to see some weird stats. A daily player can end the year with a single-digit walk total. Another could hit .350. The Sai Young winners probably won’t reach 90 innings. There may not be 20 run-heaters. We certainly don’t see any player collecting 20 stolen bases, or getting close to 20.

The hot lines will create se tu; Deep Funk will submarine others. If the whole sample is this small, what is a small sample?

Consider people like Toyskar Hernandez. His career was extremely volatile. But in the final 60 games of 2019, Hernandez set up a .952 OPS with 18 homers and 30 extra-base hits. Marcus Semian, DJ Lemahiu, and Gender Bogarts finished fifth and third in the American League MVP vote last season. And none of them had .952 OPS.

Or what about Lord’s Guerrilla Jr.? The free-swinging Toronto Blue Jays outfielder who can get his bat barrel to pitch across the entire zone and was the 82nd percentile hard-hit rated batsman in 2019? Say he started to see the ball well, got some pitches to hit and threw them into the game at extremely high speeds?

Could be something crazy. This 0-game season will provide an exciting opportunity for players to be able to achieve large numbers in a short period of time like Hernandez and Guerrilla. The instability of their results swings in two ways. You can get to the valley, where they are chasing, out and preparing for 0. Or you can get to the top – when the guy can’t miss.

“You don’t want to take that aggression away from him. That’s how he does it and he does it as nicely as he can, so I don’t want to take it away from him, ”said Charlie Monte, director of Neil Joyce, about the guerrilla approach.“ I think the older he gets, the more selective he becomes. At the moment, the way he swings the bat, I think it works for him. “

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Guerrero’s 2019 was certainly flawed. He started the season as the second baseman in Toronto every day but struggled on the plate and was unable to throw consistently and turned into a triple-buffalo in mid-April. There, the guerrillas ate 26 hits in his first 19 games – half for extra bases – in minor-league pitching. But the mental road to intercepting his throwing mechanics at the event was blocked and by mid-May he started playing left field.

Suddenly, something clicked. Not only did Gerriel not play in the Cuban national series when he was 22 years old – he was rich. He was forced to return to Toronto, went deep into his first three games and never looked back. He made 35 extra-base hits in 66 games at .295 / .344 / .591 since his return on August 8th. And he accumulated nine outfield assists during that time, good enough to lead all MLB left fielders for the season.

The early August point is significant because that day Gorriel threw his quad and pulled out an infield single. She removed him until mid-September, when he returned and went 5-for-12 in his first three games, but waited for two more days of misery two days later when Gururiel came down with appendicitis and finished his app and removed his appendix. Took.

It was the story of Gururil’s young career – the crack of productivity that is hampered by injury, usually of soft tissue diversity. In 2018, he set an American League record with 11 consecutive multi-hit games on the same day by sliding his left ankle and knee to second base. After that season, he hit a dozen hits, including four home runs in ten games, Guerrero straightened his hamstrings and sat for the rest of the year.

Grind the last two years of Gururil together and you get an impressive full season sample instead of .279 / .310 / .499 with 31 runs from 149 games. Of course, baseball doesn’t work like that. Health is a big-league skill – perhaps the most important reason why no player can take advantage of any feature other than that.

“Injuries are one of the most difficult issues for all athletes,” said Guerrero. “But it’s a new year – fresh. I’m turning the page

“It’s a big responsibility that Charlie is giving me this year, just like last year. But I’m very ready for this year. I’ve worked very hard in the off-season. And I think the lineup is going to be great this year.”

Monteiro spent most of his lineup imagining Gariel batting, behind Bo Bichetti and Cavan Biggio, and ahead of Vladimir Guerrero Jr. and Travis Shaw. And considering him one of the team’s best-conditioned athletes, it wouldn’t be a surprise to see Gerriel play virtually every day. Last season, he missed two of Toronto’s two games, all from his mid-May to August quad injury.

Remember, at the age of 226, Guerrero is still on the verge of his career. He is by no means a finished product, and every game is an opportunity to continue his improvement. For various reasons, Gururil has played only 316 games with his brother Ulyssky since his departure from Cuba in early 2014. By comparison, Ulyssky has played nearly 500 from that point, and 44 more Houston Astros the following season.

“I think the main thing Gururil needs right now is at-bats,” said Manto. “More games. Keep playing. That’s why I didn’t want to lose this year. I think we need to keep our little ones playing so they can develop experience and learn how to play in the big leagues. That’s why I think we’re playing this year. “We are one of the teams we are going to be affected by not playing this year so we are happy to play. It will be good for the kids.”

Ben Nicholson-Smith is baseball editor at Sportsnet. Arden Jowling is a veteran writer. Together, they bring you the league’s most in-depth Blue J podcasts, covering opinions and analysis as well as the latest news and interviews with other insiders and team members.

Pearson and Boruki began their work

The Blue Jays took a day off from Intrascode Scrimages on Thursday, instead choosing to run the series live on the series between the Colts and the Heaters.

All eyes were on Nate Pearson, whenever they saw the top blue Joyce possibly above the bib. And he took another impressive out against the Big-League hitter. Pearson threw six of his 11 batters, walked two (Billy McKinney and Derek Fisher), got a pair of soft groundballs and gave Hernandez a one-line drive.

Through the first two outings of the camp, Pearson turned to the talk of early spring training around which the rotation possibilities are moving forward. The next step for him will be an outing in Boston next week when Blue J goes to Fenway Park for a pair of exhibition competitions with Red Sauce.

When Montio asked, “Why does this schedule work?”, Why did Pearson choose the pitch in one of these two games. “And, also, it would be nice to see him on the pitch in Boston. This is no secret. ”

Meanwhile, Ryan Boraki threw somewhere between three and four innings, depending on how you were scoring an afternoon without any defenders on the field. He has made a lot of groundball acquaintances as he continues to refine his approach and become accustomed to a new pitch mix.

During the MLB shutdown, Blue Jess keeps Buruki’s slider short on a cutter, these live raps are especially useful because the 26-year-old learned how to play a new pitch from his fastball to set up his switch-and-miss changeup. After losing some weight over the last few months to look better at The B, he is pitching with 15 less pounds in his frame.

“I’ve always been ched in among the hitters, but I think I’ll pitch more in the decade in particular and just throw the cut from it,” Buruki said. “I just think it would be an opportunity for me to throw those changes, throw that arm and get a lot of ground. I think overall the cutter will make my things better. “

Buruki will be budgeted for 75 pitches in his next outing, which the Blue Jays have proposed to keep him ahead as a starter. There is a rotation spot for this team to occupy, of course, as Chase Anderson is not expected to face a slash injury in time for the first week of the season. And Burukir with mixed firmness.

Even if Borocci can’t win that rotating job – Anthony Keke could only have his hair earlier than the current situation stands – the club could still carry him to the start of the season as an emergency bulk arm in the bullpen. He can probably piggyback a starter if needed. Or if the season starts to get ready to start a spot under the line he can go to the club’s alternative training site.

“It simply came to our notice then. I want to help as much as I can, “he said.” I thought I was able to throw seven, eight innings today. I felt so good.

The trio of end-to-end bullpen in Toronto – Ken Giles, Anthony Bass and Rafael Dollys – start work each Thursday. The Intraswade Games will resume on Friday night if Trent Thornton wants to lead by five innings, and TJ Juich and Shan Yamaguchi will take the BBT for the opposition.