/Baseball legend Tom Sever died at the age of 75

Baseball legend Tom Sever died at the age of 75

NEW YORK – Mets legend Tom Sever died Monday of lethal body dementia and COVD-19 complications, according to the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

“We are heartened to announce the death of our beloved husband and father,” his wife Nancy Siever and daughters Sarah and Ann said in a statement. “We send our love to your fans, because we mourn your loss with you.”

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Winner of the Hall of Fame Callus and multiple Si Young Awards, sleeping died in his peace.

Sever, known as “Tom Terrific”, served in the United States Marine Corps before joining the Mets in 1966. The following year he won the Rookie of the Year award in the National League.

He also helped carry the “Miracle Mets” to the glory of the World Series in 19 Mi9, taking a team that regularly scattered at the bottom of the standings to the glory of baseball.

  • File – In this March 1968 file photo, New York Mets call Tom Sewer poses for a photo, location unknown. Sever, the galvanizing leader of the Miracle Mets 1969 championship team and the personification of the emergence of expansion teams in an era of fundamental changes for baseball, has died. The 755-year-old, The Hall of Fame, died Wednesday night, September 22, 2020, at the age of 31, from complications of Levi’s dementia and Covid-19. (AP image, file)
  • File – On July 26, 2015, a photo of the file arrives at the unveiling ceremony at Clark Sports Center in Cooperstown, the national baseball hall of farmer Tom Sever, where NYC Sever was diagnosed with dementia and retired from public life. The 4-year-old made the announcement through Thursday, March 2019, through Family Hall, and Sewer said he will continue to work in the vineyard at his home in California. (AP Photo / Mike Groll, file)
  • File – On October 4, 1969, in the photo of the file, the New York Mets call Tom Sewer threw a National League play-off game against the Atlanta Braves in Atlanta. Fifty years after their impossible World Series championship, the New York Mets have risen from the bottom of the National League standings to the full playoff race. New York starts a main series against Chicago Cuba on Tuesday, August 27, 2019. (AP image / file)
  • File – This September 27, 1969 file photo shows the New York Mets calling Tom Sever a No. 25 Mats uniform after a 25-year victory over the Philadelphia Phillies. Sewer was diagnosed with dementia and retired from public life. The 4-year-old made the announcement through Thursday, March 2019, through Family Hall, and Sewer said he will continue to work in the vineyard at his home in California. (AP image, file)
  • File – In this May 2, 1999, file photo, the New York Mets Hall of Fame pitcher Tom Sever, left, talks to former Mets player Rusty Stubb in New York on a date before a game between the 19 May 9 Mets and the National League All-Stars. Celebrating the 30th anniversary at Shea Stadium. Stubbs, who became a huge hit to baseball fans in both countries in his All-Star career throughout 23 major league seasons, died in Florida on Thursday, March 29, 2018. She was 73 years old (AP Photo / Kathy Villains, file)

The Mets issued a statement Wednesday stating that the organization was “devastated” to learn of Sewer’s death.

The statement said, “Tom is called ‘The Franchise’ and ‘Tom Tariff’ because of how valuable he really is to our organization and our loyal fans, because his # 418 first player was retired by the company in 1988,” the statement said. “He was named one of the best Mets players of all time and one of the best players of all time who was unanimously included in the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1992.”

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“Tom Siver’s life is an example of the greatness of the game, as well as honesty, character and athleticism – the hallmark of a Hall of Fame career,” said Jane Forbes Clark, chairman of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. “As a longtime member of the Hall of Fame Board of Directors, Tom brought dignity and wisdom to the organization that will be deeply missed. His love for baseball history and the Hall of Fame was strengthened in 2014, when he promised to donate his personal baseball collection to the museum. His great legacy will be preserved in Cooperstown forever.

He is survived by his wife Nancy, daughters Sarah and Anne, and grandchildren Thomas, William, Henry and Tobin.